Kristjan Sigurdson presents comparison of Canadian and US university technology transfer

CIDECLogoKristjan Sigurdson presented a comparison of university technology in the University of Toronto and the University of Wisconsin at the Joseph P. Farrell Student Research Symposium of the Comparative, International, & Development Education Centre at OISE on February 22. To see the video recording of Kristjan’s presentation, click the title above and then follow this link.

Amy Lemay presented results of research use project

Over the past few months, Amy has presented findings of the “Linking research to its uses” project, based on field work carried out in 2012 to investigate how research is used in programmatic decision making in a Public Health Unit in Ontario. From October 10-13, the venue was the casrai reconnect12 1st Annual International Conference: Occupy Impact in Montreal, which brought together stakeholders in research and innovation to share ideas and solutions for measuring the impacts of a highly diverse research community (http://reconnect.casrai.org). This month, Amy shared results with the Public Health Unit itself, the site of the ethnographic study. This project was sponsored by the Mitacs Accelerate program and CASRAI.

Amy Lemay and Andrew Kretz presented papers at the 2012 ASHE annual conference

Amy Lemay and Andrew Kretz presented papers at the 2012 Association for Study of Higher Education (ASHE) Annual Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada (USA). In one of the papers, The Uptake of University Research in Public Policy: The View of “Users” in a Public Health Unit, authors Amy Lemay and Creso Sá report on an ethnographic study of how research is used in programmatic decision making. While the literature usually highlights the lack of knowledge and capacity of users to access and use research, this study identifies the strategies of “active users” in the Public Health context to utilize research. The study was part of the project Linking research to its uses: Making sense of how decisions are informed by research, sponsored by the Mitacs Accelerate program and CASRAI.

In the other paper, Canada-U.S. Ties and University Technology Transfer, authors Creso Sá, Andrew Kretz and Kristjan Sigurdson reveal how Canadian technological nationalism was an important factors shaping how technology transfer was practiced, organized, and legitimated between the early 20th century through the 1970s at the University of Toronto. The study is part of the project The Institutionalization of Technology Transfer in Canada.

Creso Sá, Andrew Kretz and Kristjan Sigurdson presented findings on university tech transfer in the Canadian context

In September, Creso Sá, Andrew Kretz and Kristjan Sigurdson presented findings from research conducted on technology transfer activities of the University of Toronto at the 25th annual Consortium of Higher Education Researchers (CHER) conference in Belgrade, Serbia. In the presented paper, The Institutionalization of Technology Transfer in Canada: The Roots of Research Commercialization at the University of Toronto, authors Creso Sá, Andrew Kretz and Kristjan Sigurdson explore how the routines, practices and orientations towards technology transfer evolved at the University from their beginnings in the late 1910s, up to the emergence of the University of Toronto Innovations Foundation in the 1980s. The paper presented in Belgrade is the first in a series of resulting from archival research and interviews conducted at the University of Toronto on the emergence of technology transfer activities in the Canadian context at Canada’s largest research university.